Saturday Workshop: ‘Building Cultures of Peace’

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Saturday, February 13th, 4:30-6pm
(Gather at 4:15, we’ll start right at 4:30, on the back porch)
The Restoration Project at Casa Mariposa
340 S. 3rd Ave.

Peace is perhaps the most basic and nearly universal aspiration of humankind. Why then has it been so difficult to achieve? Join peace educator and author Dr. Randall Amster as he discusses his new co-edited book, Building Cultures of Peace: Transdisciplinary Voices of Hope and Action, which explores positive trends in the quest to attain a brighter future for us all.

About the workshop leader:

Randall Amster, J.D., Ph.D., teaches Peace Studies at Prescott College, and serves as the Executive Director of the Peace & Justice Studies Association. Among other works, he is the author of Lost in Space: The Criminalization, Globalization, and Urban Ecology of Homelessness (LFB Scholarly, 2008). He regularly writes on social and environmental justice issues for publications including Truthout, Common Dreams, and the Huffington Post.

About the book:

From violence and abuse within family units to communities and regions torn apart by inter-group conflict and wars among nations, the human condition is rife with turmoil. The consequences of this seemingly perpetual strife weigh heavily on humanity, often creating feelings of powerlessness and hopelessness that only serve to breed more conflict and violence. In the face of these monumental challenges, initiatives for peace struggle to take root.

Seeking effective ways to encourage these efforts, the United Nations adopted three declarations on the eve of the 21st century, including the Declaration on a Culture of Peace that broadly defines what the vision looks like and the actions necessary to build cultures of peace. Taking up this central challenge of our time, this volume of collected essays presents multiple perspectives on the critical issues of peace and conflict resolution that pervade the globe, addressing the UN’s charge to develop “values, attitudes, modes of behavior and ways of life conducive to the promotion of peace among individuals, groups, and nations.”

Bringing together scholars and practitioners from fields including education, sociology, criminology, political science, and peace studies, this work constructively engages the task of creating peace and fostering hope in a conflict-ridden world.

What others are saying:

Building Cultures of Peace is an immensely rich, creative, and, above all, an optimistic book. The fifteen very competent chapters approach the issue of a culture of peace based on social justice and equity, as opposed to the ubiquitous culture of violence. Here are concrete programs and ideas; now let us all go out, do it, and get ever higher in the knowledge, skills and art of building peace.”
—Johan Galtung, Founder, dr hc mult, TRANSCEND: A Peace, Development and Environment Network

“Since the UN launched the ‘culture of peace’ to much fanfare but little tangible result, the idea of a culture that would be more conducive to peace than war has taken hold. If further proof of that were needed, this book demonstrates that there is a ‘field’ of peace that is there to help people in all walks of life to understand and indeed contribute their bit, whatever it may be, to peace. There could hardly be a more needed development, and this book, with its diversity and yet its overriding focus on the elusive dream of peace, is a great contribution to it.”
—Michael N. Nagler, Professor Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley; author of The Search for a Nonviolent Future

The fine print if you want a copy:

Cambridge Scholars Publishing; ISBN 9781443819442; 285 pp. (paperback); $39.99; www.c-s-p.org

Saturday’s workshop is sponsored by BorderLinks and The Restoration Project at Casa Mariposa. Randall told us it would be more like an interactive workshop and not much like a lecture at all.

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